House Emergencies and Accidents

Part 1

It is very important for every family member, including the household help to have a knowledge on what to do in cases of accidents, and emergencies. Discussing it over a meal during weekend, wherein the whole family is present, or maybe you can schedule a day for a family conference.
First, we have to make sure that we have our first aid kit that is well maintained. Make sure that you have a system for replacing equipment when it has been used and check dressings and medication regularly to ensure that they are in date and undamaged.
First Aid Kit for the Home The equipment should be stored in a clearly labeled waterproof box in an easy-to-access position.
Here is what my First Aid Kit contains:
1. Small, medium, and large dressings. These are sterile pads with bandages attached that can be used to control heavy bleeding and cover minor wounds.
2. Triangular bandages. They can be used as padding around a painful area. They can provide cover for burns or large scrapes and support broken bones.
3. Band aid. For small wounds
4. Safety tape, adhesive tape, and hypoallergenic tape
5. Cotton
6. Disposable gloves
7. Blunt-ended scissors
8. Tweezers
9. Alcohol
10. Povidone-Iodine (Betadine)
11. Paracetamol, Loperamide and other over-the-counter medicines and remedies
12. Flashlight, spare batteries
13. Cold pad and hot pad
First Aid Kit in the Car
I also have a small first aid kit in the car, and here is what it contains:
1. Flashlight
2. Tissue paper, Wet wipes
3. Band aid
4. Povidone-iodine (Betadine)
5. Alcohol
6. Vomit bags
7. Disposable Face masks
8. Over-the-counter medicines like paracetamol, loperamide, etc.
9. Notepad and pen
10. Safety pins
The following are my compiled lists of possible house emergencies and accidents. I have a printout of these lists in my home and was posted on the corkboard in the kitchen near the First Aid Kit for easy access.

Electric shock can cause unconsciousness or stop breathing and heartbeat.Determine what has happened, then perform the appropriate procedure.
FIRST AID CANNOT BE PERFORMED UNTIL VICTIM HAS BEEN SEPARATED FROM THE CURRENT.

What To Do
1. Turn off the electricity, make sure the victim is no longer in contact with the electric current before you attempt to treat him/her.
2. If you are unable to turn off the current, stand on a dry insulating material (such as a rubber mat or a thick pile of newspaper).
3. Use a wooden broom, stool or chair to push the victim's body away from the electrical appliance or outlet.
4. If the victim is unconscious, Perform chest compressions immediately for anyone adult or child who is unresponsive and not breathing normally. Chest compressions are absolutely essential for keeping oxygen-rich blood circulating through the body.
5. Get help.
Choking
Signs of choking:
1.The person's face becomes red, then blue.
2. Pointing at throat, or grasping it.
3. The person has problems speaking and breathing.

Adults
If the person is breathing
1. Bend her/him over, head lower than chest.
2. Encourage her/him to cough.
3. Slap her/him between shoulder blades 4-5 times.
4. Check airway to see if obstruction ( a piece of food or a small plaything) can be removed.
5. If the slaps are unsuccessful, give up to 5 abdominal thrusts.
6. Repeat back slaps and abdominal thrusts until airway is clear.
Abdominal thrusts:- Stand behind the person, interlocking your hands below his or her ribcage. Pull inwards and upwards
If the victim is not breathing
1. Perform chest compressions immediately for anyone adult or child who is unresponsive and not breathing normally. Chest compressions are absolutely essential for keeping oxygen-rich blood circulating through the body.
2. If you are unable to get breath into him/her, turn them onto one side. Then, slap between shoulder blades up to 5 times. Try to remove obstruction.
3. If the slaps are unsuccessful, kneel over victim. Give up to 5 abdominal thrusts. If breathing returns, call for help.
4. If unsuccessful, repeat chest compression, then Get help
Caution:
NEVER use abdominal thrusts on a baby.

Baby
1. Lay baby along your forearm or thigh, keeping his/her face down and the head low and supported.
2. Give up to 5 slaps between the shoulder blades.
3. If this does not work, turn baby on its back, keeping head down. Give up to 5 chest thrusts
4. If this does not work, call an ambulance or bring him/her to the nearest hospital at once. Repeat the sequence of back slaps and chest thrusts.
5. If the breathing stops, Perform chest compressions immediately for anyone adult or child who is unresponsive and not breathing normally. Chest compressions are absolutely essential for keeping oxygen-rich blood circulating through the body."
Children Over 1 year of age
1. Encourage the child to cough.
2. Bend child forward, keeping head lower than chest, and give up to 5 slaps between the shoulder blades.
3. If it does not work, lay child on its back and give up to 5 chest thrusts. Use the same hand position as you used for chest compressions, but press more sharply and at a rate of about 20 thrusts per minute.
4. If it does not work, give another 5 back slaps.
5. If it does not work, give abdominal thrusts.
6. If it does not work, call an ambulance or bring him/her to the nearest hospital at once. Continue the sequence of back slaps, chest thrusts, back slaps and abdominal thrusts. If breathing stops, start mouth-to-mouth ventilation
Poisoning
Poisonous Fumes or Gases
Signs
1. Rapid, weak pulse
2. Headache
3. Blurred vision
4. Drowsiness (may lead to unconsciousness)
5. Breathing difficulties
Treatment
1. Immediately carry or drag victim to fresh air (minimize your exposure to the fumes).
2. If the victim is not breathing, Perform chest compressions immediately for anyone adult or child who is unresponsive and not breathing normally. Chest compressions are absolutely essential for keeping oxygen-rich blood circulating through the body.
Swallowed Poisons/Medications
Signs
1. Pale, cool, clammy skin
2. Rapid, weak pulse
3. Nausea and/or vomiting
4. Burns around the mouth
5. Burning pain in the mouth or throat
6. Stomach pains or cramps
7. Drowsiness (may lead to unconsciousness)
Treatment
1. Look into the victim's mouth and remove all tablets, powder or any material that is present.
2. Examine the mouth for cuts, burns, swelling, unusual coloring or odor.
3. Rinse and wipe out the mouth with a cloth.
4. Call for Ambulance or bring him/her to the nearest hospital.
NEVER produce vomiting if the patient is drowsy, unconscious, or has swallowed acids.
This is only the first part of this article, I will posting its second part soon J


Lovingly written by Joy












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